A TEXT POST

captainjamestklrk:

larrrrrrystylinson:

larrrrrrystylinson:

larrrrrrystylinson:

MY BIRD IS SITTING IN THE TOP CORNER OF HER CAGE CALLING MY DOG’S NAME AND ASKING IF HE WANTS A TREAT AND IF HE WANTS TO GO TO OUTSIDE AND HE’S TOO STUPID TO REALIZE IT’S HER SO EVERYTIME SHE SAYS SOMETHING HE LOOKS AT ME LIKE

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SHE LAUGHS EVERYTIME TOO AND NOW HE’S JUMPING ON ME AND BARKING AND GETTING MAD AT ME LIKE OLIVER TURN AROUND AND LOOK IN THAT HUGE ASS CAGE AND BEG HER FOR A FUCKING TREAT OR SOMETHING. 

NOW SHE ASKED IF HE WANTS TO GO FOR A WALK 

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SOMEONE HELP. 

NO OLIVER, IGNORE ECHO. NO ONE IS HERE 

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I PROMISE. 

I’M 1000% DONE.

"OLI GO CAGE." NO OLI 

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DON’T. 

GO. 

CAGE. 

Reblogged from ambitions like ribbons
A TEXT POST

septembriseur:

Wow, OK, I had kind of conceptualized that Joss Whedon post along the lines of “here are some random thoughts that I’m gonna store behind a cut in case a few people are interested,” not expecting so many people to reblog it. But since there was so much interest, I ended up thinking about it more. And the direction my thinking took me in was this: what is it that women find attractive in male and female characters, and to what extent does this match up with what men assume that women find attractive in these characters?

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I agree with alllll of this - it resembles thoughts that have been stewing in my mind for a long time, kicked off by male comic book fans claiming that huge musclebound male heroes are equivalent to chesty and twisted female ones - but there’s an extra kink. While Joss Whedon’s female characters are informed by men’s ideas of what women want, it’s important to remember that a) a LOT of women adore Buffy, if he does believe that her tropes are something women enjoy, it’s not solely coming from his male privilege and what other men have said to him, and b) while the two archetypes mentioned are ones that he has written, it seems more accurate to me to acknowledge Zoe, Willow, Fred, Kaylee, Sierra, Adelle, etc. as female characters that don’t fit into them.

A QUOTE

Every single Marvel Studios movie has centered around a presumably straight, white, male protagonist, even if white women (mostly love interests) and men of color (support roles) have played roles in the film. The franchise is a box office juggernaut and has a ton of movies on this list, but we’ve gotten two to three movies about each of the men on the Avengers and there’s yet to be a film about Black Widow.

Both of Marvel’s ensemble films—The Avengers and Guardians of the Galaxy—trimmed down the superhero teams for their film adaptations, and the women characters, save for one, were the first to be cut. Most moviegoers will never know that women of color and LGBTQ characters were cut from Guardians of the Galaxy, but audiences will get to relate to the talking raccoon and the talking tree.

Reblogged from mostly harmless
A VIDEO

grandpafucker:

lifeisducky:

yeltumpar:

I <3 William Shatner on Twitter

I love how they respond to him, as if he is actually a captain, even more.

Nasa confirmed for huge fucking nerds

Reblogged from Deer God
A VIDEO

mysweetetc:

Tim Burton is making a movie about a true story of Margaret Keane, a painter who got screwed over by her husband.

It has Christopher Waltz, no Johnny Depp, and looks REALLY good.

I hope this gets a not-too-limited release, so my mom and I can see it together.

Reblogged from my sweet etc.
A QUOTE

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

A VIDEO

ohhowlucky:

danteogodofsoup:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

standupcomedyblog:

John Mulaney | The Salt & Pepper Diner

THE BEST JOKE IN EXISTENCE

GOD I JUST TOLD SOMEONE ABOUT THIS STORY

This is one of the best pieces of comedy that I have ever had the pleasure of witnessing. I love this. I have been looking for this online for awhile.

Reblogged from ribbon couture
A TEXT POST

tiny-librarian:

Is anyone else getting a weird thing where single pictures are sort of like a thumbnail in the top left corner till you click on it?

Yes, and I don’t like it.

A QUOTE

I really have to take issue with this: “the Western portion of the world, Westeros - the rich and civilized portion.” This isn’t true.

1. Westeros is poorer and less economically developed than Essos. It’s far less urbanized than Essos. It’s an exporter primarily of natural resources and can’t produce the advanced manufactured goods it imports from the Free Cities. Its financial system is really quite crude, especially in comparison to the large banks and insurance companies of Braavos. It has very few roads and none of them Valyrian; main thoroughfares like the Kingsroad don’t have bridges over major rivers but use fords instead; it lacks internal canals to connect major river systems.

2. Westeros is less politically developed. It’s only been politically unified for 300 years, and even that weak feudal state is extremely shaky and may not survive. Essos has had continent-spanning empires that lasted for thousands of years. It has much more diversity of political systems - republics with separation of powers and political parties, merchant oligarchies, elected tyrants, etc.

3. Westeros is considered less culturally developed. Essosi call Westerosi unwashed barbarians, referring to them by the inaccurate title of “Andals.” (reminds me of the way Americans and Europeans labeled various nationalities by incorrect names because they didn’t speak the language) The Essosi of the Free Cities are the blood of Old Valyria; the Ghiscari have their empire, the Dothraki have their prophecies of manifest destiny, and the Qartheen are the pureblooded descendants of the greatest city that ever was or ever will be. Westerosi nobles are sent to the Free Cities to get culturally enriched, not the other way around. In terms of cultural production, most mummers are imported from Essos, as Westeros has no tradition of theater.

When engaging with ASOIAF, you have to analyze the world of Planetos as it is, rather than automatically applying heuristics based on our own world. Assuming that west = rich, civilized, and east = the Other (because that’s how it’s been presented in the past) is falling into the same essentialist trap that Edward Said and others are critiquing.

Reblogged from ASOIAF University
A TEXT POST

copperbadge:

ame-kage replied to your post “What’s a BNF?”

Why is BNF considered a pejorative?

notimpossiblejustabitunlikely replied to your post “What’s a BNF?”

You don’t have the ego problems that usually lead to it being used as a pejorative, so embrace it!

I feel these comments go together somehow….:D

BNF can be used pejoratively to imply that the person in question is putting on airs, getting above themselves, or being arrogant/egotistical; it can also subtly refer to someone who is not above encouraging bad behavior on the part of their followers. Some BNFs in the early days of LJ, and really reaching as far back as the old usenet days, could have some pretty problematic behaviors that inspired this perception. People who have large readerships now still sometimes get tarred with that brush, whether they engage in those behaviors or not — and sometimes if they engage in perfectly normal behavior that reads to outsiders like egotism because of the context it’s in. I honestly think most BNFs don’t have the BNF Problem, their awkwardness is just magnified by the size of their readership.  

For example, most people online form friendships, and often form small inner communities of friends with shared in-jokes, catchphrases, and general experiences. That’s normal human behavior, having friends, having a circle of friends. But when you’re a BNF, and people want to enter your circle of friends because you have prestige or the attention of a lot of people or for whatever reason, that person’s totally normal friendships can look to outsiders like a clique or even a conspiracy. I’ve been accused of having a clique; no, what I have is friends. If a BNF is quiet because they’re shy, it can be seen as aloofness; if they have a disagreement with someone, it can be seen as an attack. Because of an external perception, that I have a clique and I’m king of it (which is laughably untrue), I can be seen as one of “those” BNFs, the kind who gathers followers and then holds merciless sway over them.

The stakes are just higher — you get more attention, your work gets more attention, and when you make a mistake, you suffer for it far longer than someone else might. That’s just how it rolls; you take the good with the bad. 

The truth is I’m a klutz who routinely falls over while doing yoga, I’m socially awkward enough in person that I have very few brickspace close friends, and I do what I can to get along in life, the same as everyone else. Nobody is universally liked, and of course I don’t enjoy being disliked, but I’m willing to deal with that for the pleasure the rest of my online interactions bring me. 

I think it’s not just that disagreements can look like attacks - what I’ve seen draw a lot of grumbling about BNFdom is when a fan with a big following posts a disagreement which results in their followers piling onto the person being disagreed with. (Sometimes there has been a call to action which was intended as rhetorical, and would have just been rhetorical had someone with fewer fans made it.)

It’s something that’s hard to discuss, because - in my experience - the folks who have the potential to cause this sort of thing feel it’s unfair to pin other people’s behavior on them. Which is true, to an extent! But whether or not someone is a textbook BNF or just popular and friendly, the extra fallout that can come from the attention they give to a person or cause is definitely a thing that affects how people perceive them. 

Reblogged from The Sundry Times
A VIDEO

heyredridingwolf:

trinandtonic:

dontbearuiner:

lawebloca:

Friends

This is a very important post.

babies babying together

OH GOD

Reblogged from ribbon couture
A VIDEO

shutupstrax:

And in this gifset I demonstrate to you how I feel after 90% of my conversations

A PHOTO

kimberlite8:

kitamere:

It’s mid-September, so it’s not too early to start thinking about Halloween, right?  Particularly if one is considering sewing a costume!

I saw these Simplicity patterns at JoAnn Fabrics today.  I have to admit, it was kind of exciting to see the one based on Sansa’s dress.  (Of course, there the most Dany patterns.)

For one wild moment, I thought, “maybe they have a pattern for the Hound!”  But I didn’t find any Game of Thrones-based costume patterns for men, though, not even for Jon Snow or Jaime.  Maybe next Halloween?

This is so cool that they have patterns for GOT costumes available at JoAnn’s. 

One of my favorite things in the world is Big Three movie knockoff patterns. There’s always some text in the catalog books that hints toward the origins, but of course they can’t come out and say it because it’s unlicensed. There’s more GoTTitanic, Snow White and the Huntsman, Downton Abbey, LotR/The Hobbit, The Hobbit and Dany in one easy package!, Mirror Mirror, PotC, Brave, OUAT and more OUAT …

You can even get a pattern for the Middleton sisters’ wedding/bridesmaid dresses.